AGENDA

January 7-29, 2021

 

Thursday, January 7th

ON DEMAND  Returning Joy to Patient Care: Clinical Workplace Hacks that Reduce Burnout  Paul DeChant


Paul DeChant, CEO/Principal, Paul DeChant, MD, MBA, LLC This presentation will review the manifestations and drivers of burnout, the impact on individuals and organizations, and present a process by which leaders can transform workflows, management systems, and culture to reduce burnout while engaging, empowering, and aligning clinicians and executive leaders.

  • Understand how the drivers of burnout relate to the manifestations of burnout and impact clinician engagement
  • Learn new opportunities to improve the physician-patient connection and professional fulfillment
  • Identify opportunities to reduce the impact of the EHR on physician burnout




ON DEMAND Regular or Extra Crispy – Lessons from the Field in Addressing Burnout Elisa Arespacochaga, American Hospital Association


Elisa Arespacochaga, Vice President, Physician Alliance, American Hospital Association Hear how your colleagues around the country are understanding and creating space where they can address the drivers of burnout and begin to thrive in the rapidly changing world of hospitals and health care.

  • Describe the drivers of work-life balance and the roles of leadership in addressing burnout
  • Understand the seven key steps for organizational well-being
  • Develop ways you can join your colleagues across the country to combat burnout and thrive




ON DEMAND  Caregiver Burnout: The Burning Platfrom - Making the Case for Advanced Team-Based Care


Kevin D. Hopkins, MD, Primary Care Medical Director, Cleveland Clinic

Healthcare complexity is increasing, physician burnout is worsening. Innumerable factors exert pressure on our system and its people-something has to give. This session will call out many of those stressors as well as ways to recognize burnout in ourselves and colleagues. Novel practice redesign models and available practice transformation resources for caregiver burnout prevention and mitigation will be shared.

  • Describe and recognize common causes of and risk factors for caregiver burnout;
  • Discuss the adverse effects of burnout on the caregiver, their patients, and the healthcare organizations
  • Evaluate the opportunity of team-based care as a means of sharing the workload of patient care, and gain awareness of resources available to transform the care model




ON DEMAND Panel: Physician Distress:  If it's not Burnout, What is it?


Wendy Dean, MD, CEO and CoFounder, The Moral Injury of Healthcare Heather Farley, MD, MHCDS, FACEP, Chief Wellness Officer, ChristianaCare Moderated by: Nicole F. Roberts, Founder & President, Health & Human Rights Strategies Burnout in healthcare has been recognized, measured, and addressed for more than a decade. But the numbers of physicians who are struggling has barely budged. The National Academy of Medicine report from October 2019 acknowledged that, despite a decade of scholarship and interventions, the committee could not recommend any specific intervention. Perhaps this is because “burnout” is not the problem. Some advocate for claiming human rights violations. The concept of moral injury has resonated profoundly with doctors and other licensee groups. Finding the right language for our distress--that accurately describes our experience but which also allows others to hear what we feel--is critical to shaping solutions that will make medicine better for patients and sustainable for clinicians.

  • Understand the difference between burnout, human rights violations, and moral injury and how they may be related
  • Identify the drivers of distress (conflict between the Hippocratic Oath to put our patient as our first priority, and employer expectations of our priorities)
  • Have tools to negotiate change in one’s environment to improve “physician well being” and address moral injury




11:00am  LIVE Interactive Discussion with Peers and Speakers


We invite all attendees to a live session with speakers, sponsors and your peers. We hope that you have reviewed the various sessions that have been made available on demand, but even if you have not, you will gain much from this live session. It is unique and we believe very special.

Networking and hallway conversations are staples of in-person events. Attendees expect the ability to connect and share with colleagues, sponsors, and speakers. These interactions will go beyond Q&A sessions, live chat, and polling. These facilitated discussions will break into more intimate settings for small groups of attendees to talk among themselves, the way you might chat over lunch at a live conference.

Participants will join small breakout rooms to discuss the different questions and then all come together, and with a skilled facilitator, share your discussions with the entire group. This will not only be an opportunity to simulate a typical ‘live conference’ conversation with fellow attendees, but an opportunity to network and share contact information.




12:30pm LIVE - Do Innovation and Technology Hold the Keys to Solving the Scale of the Burnout Crisis and Restoring Mental Well-Being to Healthcare Professionals?- Interactive Discussion


Murray Zucker, MD, Medical Director, Happify Health

Jeffrey S. Levy, MD, CEO and Founder of CaseNetwork; Author, CoreWellness, a Physician Wellness Program

Moderated by Catherine Florio Pipas, MD, MPH, Chief Wellness Officer, CaseNetwork
Professor, Community & Family Medicine, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and Author of "A Doctor's Dozen"

Join us for a lively discussion as we hear from mental health technology entrepreneurs and fellow physicians, Dr. Jeffrey Levy and Dr. Murray Zucker, as they discuss the rising importance of technology and the role it can play:

  • Reaching healthcare professionals that otherwise would not seek help for burnout

  • Reducing the cost of burnout to institutions

  • Scaling a program for organizational wellbeing





 

Tuesday, January 12th

ON DEMAND  An Integrated Approach to Thriving - Lessons from the National Taskforce for Humanity in Healthcare


Read Pierce, M.D., Lead Faculty, National Taskforce for Humanity in Healthcare; Sr Consultant, The Institute for Healthcare Excellence
William Maples, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer The Institute for Healthcare Excellence

The session will address lessons from the National Taskforce for Humanity in Healthcare (NTH), a cross-industry collaboration focused on burnout, culture transformation, and providing the skills necessary to achieve sustainable excellence in healthcare. We will address how a focus on culture and thriving can impact the majority of key organizational metrics, including outcomes from the NHT's pilot program to reduce burnout and enhance thriving from 2018-2020.

  • Explore the rationale for changing the conversation from one focused on burnout and change initiatives to one focused on thriving and sustainable performance
  • Discuss approaches that lead to sustainable change toward a work environment that enhances clinical team performance, professional wellbeing, and a culture of excellence
  • Review outcomes on key performance indicators that organizations experience when using these approaches to create a culture of excellence, thriving, and performance




ON DEMAND  Bite-Sized Well-Being


J. Bryan Sexton, PhD, Associate Professor and Director, Duke Center for Healthcare Safety & Quality, Duke University Health System

Quality improvement efforts frequently ignore the need to make sure that health care workers are ready for the next big initiative, and rarely do they first build up the resilience of staff before expecting even higher levels of quality and safety to be delivered. For some, jumping into innovation is a reasonable first step. But for many individuals and work units, there needs to be a focus on the workers, and their needs, to build capacity and bounce back from burnout, before providing the training and the tools to improve quality in a sustainable way.

  • Review the newest and most robust research on healthcare worker burnout/engagement and their association with care quality
  • Demonstrate the link between healthcare worker assessments of work place norms and clinical & operational outcomes.
  • Explore the use of simple, brief, evidence-based interventions used to enhance well-being




ON DEMAND  Strategies to Reduce Cognitive Overload, Improve Clinician Well-being and Patient Safety


Rhonda Collins, DNP, RN, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer, Vocera Communications, Inc. As humans, we make sense of things through segmenting information. In hospitals, nurses and physicians constantly segment by triaging requests and shifting priorities. When clinicians receive too much information from people and systems at once, they become overloaded. It’s when mistakes happen. Learn how to help mitigate cognitive overload and improve the safety and well-being of both patients and clinicians.

  • Define the 8 core cognitive human capacities and identify root causes of cognitive overload
  • Discuss the impact cognitive overload can have on the well-being and safety of both patients and clinicians
  • Outline solutions to reduce cognitive burden to improve clinician well-being and patient safety




ON DEMAND  Addressing and Transforming Physician Suicide Trends


Perry Lin, MD, FACP, Assistant Program Director, Internal Medicine, Mount Carmel Health System In recent years physician suicide has been an often-discussed topic in popular media with documentaries being made and physicians speaking up about suicide rates in peer reviewed journal. Despite the attention on the topic there continues to exist misinformation among the healthcare industry about physician suicide. The popular statistic of 400 physicians dying a year has been debunked but still shows up in every article written. Though much of the innovation being done in changing this discussion around suicide has revolved around the younger generation of physicians, often millennials and younger, the most at-risk group continues to be Caucasian males over 65, a group usually ignored by many. In this session, conference delegates will learn about suicide trends in the United States and among various subgroups and at-risk populations. You will be taught about the unique barriers to help seeking behavior in physicians and specific areas in which physicians are at higher risk than the general population. Finally, you will be shown effective interventions strategies that will change the suicide rates. With the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 and physicians in distress at higher rates than they have ever been it is imperative we create a safety net for our doctors.

  • Identify the current trend of suicide in the United States and the various factors that affect rates of suicide
  • Distinguish the many areas in which rumors, stigma, and implicit bias can hinder help seeking behavior
  • Understand the various aspects of a suicide prevention program





 

Wednesday, January 13th

ON DEMAND  Returning Joy to Patient Care: Clinical Workplace Hacks that Reduce Burnout  Paul DeChant


Paul DeChant, CEO/Principal, Paul DeChant, MD, MBA, LLC This presentation will review the manifestations and drivers of burnout, the impact on individuals and organizations, and present a process by which leaders can transform workflows, management systems, and culture to reduce burnout while engaging, empowering, and aligning clinicians and executive leaders.

  • Understand how the drivers of burnout relate to the manifestations of burnout and impact clinician engagement
  • Learn new opportunities to improve the physician-patient connection and professional fulfillment
  • Identify opportunities to reduce the impact of the EHR on physician burnout




ON DEMAND Regular or Extra Crispy – Lessons from the Field in Addressing Burnout Elisa Arespacochaga, American Hospital Association


Elisa Arespacochaga, Vice President, Physician Alliance, American Hospital Association Hear how your colleagues around the country are understanding and creating space where they can address the drivers of burnout and begin to thrive in the rapidly changing world of hospitals and health care.

  • Describe the drivers of work-life balance and the roles of leadership in addressing burnout
  • Understand the seven key steps for organizational well-being
  • Develop ways you can join your colleagues across the country to combat burnout and thrive




ON DEMAND  Caregiver Burnout: The Burning Platfrom - Making the Case for Advanced Team-Based Care


Kevin D. Hopkins, MD, Primary Care Medical Director, Cleveland Clinic

Healthcare complexity is increasing, physician burnout is worsening. Innumerable factors exert pressure on our system and its people-something has to give. This session will call out many of those stressors as well as ways to recognize burnout in ourselves and colleagues. Novel practice redesign models and available practice transformation resources for caregiver burnout prevention and mitigation will be shared.

  • Describe and recognize common causes of and risk factors for caregiver burnout;
  • Discuss the adverse effects of burnout on the caregiver, their patients, and the healthcare organizations
  • Evaluate the opportunity of team-based care as a means of sharing the workload of patient care, and gain awareness of resources available to transform the care model




ON DEMAND Panel: Physician Distress:  If it's not Burnout, What is it?


Wendy Dean, MD, CEO and CoFounder, The Moral Injury of Healthcare Heather Farley, MD, MHCDS, FACEP, Chief Wellness Officer, ChristianaCare Moderated by: Nicole F. Roberts, Founder & President, Health & Human Rights Strategies Burnout in healthcare has been recognized, measured, and addressed for more than a decade. But the numbers of physicians who are struggling has barely budged. The National Academy of Medicine report from October 2019 acknowledged that, despite a decade of scholarship and interventions, the committee could not recommend any specific intervention. Perhaps this is because “burnout” is not the problem. Some advocate for claiming human rights violations. The concept of moral injury has resonated profoundly with doctors and other licensee groups. Finding the right language for our distress--that accurately describes our experience but which also allows others to hear what we feel--is critical to shaping solutions that will make medicine better for patients and sustainable for clinicians.

  • Understand the difference between burnout, human rights violations, and moral injury and how they may be related
  • Identify the drivers of distress (conflict between the Hippocratic Oath to put our patient as our first priority, and employer expectations of our priorities)
  • Have tools to negotiate change in one’s environment to improve “physician well being” and address moral injury




11:00am  LIVE Interactive Discussion with Peers and Speakers


We invite all attendees to a live session with speakers, sponsors and your peers. We hope that you have reviewed the various sessions that have been made available on demand, but even if you have not, you will gain much from this live session. It is unique and we believe very special.

Networking and hallway conversations are staples of in-person events. Attendees expect the ability to connect and share with colleagues, sponsors, and speakers. These interactions will go beyond Q&A sessions, live chat, and polling. These facilitated discussions will break into more intimate settings for small groups of attendees to talk among themselves, the way you might chat over lunch at a live conference.

Participants will join small breakout rooms to discuss the different questions and then all come together, and with a skilled facilitator, share your discussions with the entire group. This will not only be an opportunity to simulate a typical ‘live conference’ conversation with fellow attendees, but an opportunity to network and share contact information.




12:30pm LIVE - Do Innovation and Technology Hold the Keys to Solving the Scale of the Burnout Crisis and Restoring Mental Well-Being to Healthcare Professionals?- Interactive Discussion


Murray Zucker, MD, Medical Director, Happify Health

Jeffrey S. Levy, MD, CEO and Founder of CaseNetwork; Author, CoreWellness, a Physician Wellness Program

Moderated by Catherine Florio Pipas, MD, MPH, Chief Wellness Officer, CaseNetwork
Professor, Community & Family Medicine, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and Author of "A Doctor's Dozen"

Join us for a lively discussion as we hear from mental health technology entrepreneurs and fellow physicians, Dr. Jeffrey Levy and Dr. Murray Zucker, as they discuss the rising importance of technology and the role it can play:

  • Reaching healthcare professionals that otherwise would not seek help for burnout

  • Reducing the cost of burnout to institutions

  • Scaling a program for organizational wellbeing





 

Tuesday, January 19th

ON DEMAND Panel: Finding the Middle Ground: Connected Care after COVID 19


Moderator: Wendy Dean, MD, President & CEO and CoFounder, The Moral Injury of Healthcare
Robert Groves, MD, Executive VP and Chief Medical Officer, Banner Aetna
Hallie Brooks, MD, ER Physician, Emergency Medicine Associates
Jon White, MS, BSN, RN CCRN,

The pandemic exposed gaps and vulnerabilities in healthcare systems. We learned how shortages of staff, supplies, and space could leave health systems intensely vulnerable. It showed how chronic underfunding of certain sectors left some populations profoundly vulnerable to poor outcomes. But it also highlighted the amazing progress possible if various sectors of the system—clinicians, administrators, technical staff, and others—come together to address challenges. The decisions we make as we transition out of the pandemic will be a one-time opportunity to rethink, in a larger scale, how healthcare is structured. It will be critical to capture the culture of cooperation, respect, and mutual empathy that engendered such communal effort. Fostering that culture to address the persistent challenges in healthcare is the first step toward better care for patients that is sustainable for clinicians.

How can front line physicians and nurses remain connected in the decision-making process? Join Wendy Dean, MD as she sits down with panelists from across the healthcare team to discuss what we have learned from COVID19 and how those lessons learned will reshape the healthcare landscape.




ON DEMAND  The Unseen Connection Between Medical Science and "Physician Burnout"


Anoop Kumar, MD, Emergency Physician

Modern medicine has brought us penicillin, pacemakers, and prosthetic limbs. It saves lives. The ugly truth is it also takes lives - not only through errors, but through systematically teaching incomplete and dangerous ideas and behaviors. This is the cause of physician and nurse suicide that even physicians and nurses don't want to think about, because it challenges what we think we know. Bring attention to the fact that, despite the apparent moderness of medicine, we still don’t have answers to the most basic questions: What is the human body made of? What is the mind? Where is the mind?

  • Explain how our incomplete medical understanding is directly related to physician and nurse suicide
  • Explain the fact that medical science has not kept up with the latest findings in physics
  • Present a more complete view of human anatomy that is consistent with today’s science and discuss its potential to solve big problems




ON DEMAND  How Electronic Health Record Reporting Program can Improve Clinician Experiences with Health IT


Gary W. Ozanich, Ph.D., Senior Consultant, HealthTech Solutions

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT's (ONC) new Electronic Health Record Reporting Program will provide publicly available, comparative information on certified health IT products in order to improve the marketplace. This session will describe the process to determine what information health IT vendors should report for the program and aim to obtain participant feedback on what the program should focus on to improve clinician experiences with health IT.

  • Review the newest and most robust research on healthcare worker burnout/engagement and their association with care quality

  • Demonstrate the link between healthcare worker assessments of work place norms and clinical & operational outcomes.

  • Explore the use of simple, brief, evidence-based interventions used to enhance well-being




ON DEMAND  Panel - Watching Out for the Risk of Physician Suicide


Perry Lin, MD, FACP, Assistant Program Director, Internal Medicine, Mount Carmel Health System
Dr. Mona Masood, DO, Founder and Chief Organizer, Physician Support Line

Physician suicide prevention is a critically important topic for all those involved in the wellness of physicians. Often this topic is avoided and skirted in discussions because it can be difficult and show critical flaws in the safety net of our health systems. In this panel discussion we will talk with the thought leaders in physician wellbeing about stigma, interventions, and what exists today. We will discuss the patchwork of reporting guidelines among the various states and territories in the United States, and the even more confusing credentialing system that exists in every single hospital. We will discuss how all aspects of a universal physician wellness program can also be part of a suicide prevention program. Join us for a lively discussion of how to watch out for our doctors.

  • Identify the barriers to help seeking behavior and how that can lead to suicide risk
  • Understand how various aspects of wellness also decrease suicide risk
  • Discover areas of weakness within states and hospital systems that are potential holes in our safety nets




ON DEMAND  Strategies and Recommendations to Reduce Clinician Burden: An Overview of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ February 2020 Report Thomas A. Mason, MD, HHS


Thomas A. Mason, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

On February 21, 2020, The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released a report, Strategy on Reducing Regulatory and Administrative Burdens Relating to the Use of Health IT and EHRs. A collaborative effort between the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), the report provides examples of electronic health record (EHR)-related burden and details strategies, recommendations, and policy shifts that aim to give clinicians more time to focus on what matters – caring for their patients. Clinicians have long maintained that fulfilling burdensome administrative and regulatory requirements takes time away from actual care delivery, interferes with the doctor-patient relationship and can lead to burnout.

Thomas Mason, M.D., ONC’s Chief Medical Officer, will explore these goals and sources of burden and will discuss several strategies and recommendations highlighted in the report.

  • Discover the report’s three primary goals for reducing health care provider burden
  • Gain insights informed by extensive stakeholder outreach and engagement
  • Understand the four aspects of EHR-related burden to which the report’s strategies and recommendations are aligned





 

Wednesday, January 20th

ON DEMAND  An Integrated Approach to Thriving - Lessons from the National Taskforce for Humanity in Healthcare


Read Pierce, M.D., Lead Faculty, National Taskforce for Humanity in Healthcare; Sr Consultant, The Institute for Healthcare Excellence
William Maples, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer The Institute for Healthcare Excellence

The session will address lessons from the National Taskforce for Humanity in Healthcare (NTH), a cross-industry collaboration focused on burnout, culture transformation, and providing the skills necessary to achieve sustainable excellence in healthcare. We will address how a focus on culture and thriving can impact the majority of key organizational metrics, including outcomes from the NHT's pilot program to reduce burnout and enhance thriving from 2018-2020.

  • Explore the rationale for changing the conversation from one focused on burnout and change initiatives to one focused on thriving and sustainable performance
  • Discuss approaches that lead to sustainable change toward a work environment that enhances clinical team performance, professional wellbeing, and a culture of excellence
  • Review outcomes on key performance indicators that organizations experience when using these approaches to create a culture of excellence, thriving, and performance




ON DEMAND  Bite-Sized Well-Being


J. Bryan Sexton, PhD, Associate Professor and Director, Duke Center for Healthcare Safety & Quality, Duke University Health System

Quality improvement efforts frequently ignore the need to make sure that health care workers are ready for the next big initiative, and rarely do they first build up the resilience of staff before expecting even higher levels of quality and safety to be delivered. For some, jumping into innovation is a reasonable first step. But for many individuals and work units, there needs to be a focus on the workers, and their needs, to build capacity and bounce back from burnout, before providing the training and the tools to improve quality in a sustainable way.

  • Review the newest and most robust research on healthcare worker burnout/engagement and their association with care quality
  • Demonstrate the link between healthcare worker assessments of work place norms and clinical & operational outcomes.
  • Explore the use of simple, brief, evidence-based interventions used to enhance well-being




ON DEMAND  Strategies to Reduce Cognitive Overload, Improve Clinician Well-being and Patient Safety


Rhonda Collins, DNP, RN, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer, Vocera Communications, Inc. As humans, we make sense of things through segmenting information. In hospitals, nurses and physicians constantly segment by triaging requests and shifting priorities. When clinicians receive too much information from people and systems at once, they become overloaded. It’s when mistakes happen. Learn how to help mitigate cognitive overload and improve the safety and well-being of both patients and clinicians.

  • Define the 8 core cognitive human capacities and identify root causes of cognitive overload
  • Discuss the impact cognitive overload can have on the well-being and safety of both patients and clinicians
  • Outline solutions to reduce cognitive burden to improve clinician well-being and patient safety




ON DEMAND  Addressing and Transforming Physician Suicide Trends


Perry Lin, MD, FACP, Assistant Program Director, Internal Medicine, Mount Carmel Health System In recent years physician suicide has been an often-discussed topic in popular media with documentaries being made and physicians speaking up about suicide rates in peer reviewed journal. Despite the attention on the topic there continues to exist misinformation among the healthcare industry about physician suicide. The popular statistic of 400 physicians dying a year has been debunked but still shows up in every article written. Though much of the innovation being done in changing this discussion around suicide has revolved around the younger generation of physicians, often millennials and younger, the most at-risk group continues to be Caucasian males over 65, a group usually ignored by many. In this session, conference delegates will learn about suicide trends in the United States and among various subgroups and at-risk populations. You will be taught about the unique barriers to help seeking behavior in physicians and specific areas in which physicians are at higher risk than the general population. Finally, you will be shown effective interventions strategies that will change the suicide rates. With the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 and physicians in distress at higher rates than they have ever been it is imperative we create a safety net for our doctors.

  • Identify the current trend of suicide in the United States and the various factors that affect rates of suicide
  • Distinguish the many areas in which rumors, stigma, and implicit bias can hinder help seeking behavior
  • Understand the various aspects of a suicide prevention program